3.1: From Background Question to Research Question

With a more robust understanding of your topic including subtopics and issues, you can use the background research to formulate a specific research question. Having a research question will giveRed Question Mark and graphic of person thinking an outline to your search strategy as you focus in on finding sources that provide evidence and support to “answer” the question.

What makes a good research question?

  1. Questions that are focused on a specific issue or subtopic related to your initial background research inquiry. Notice the difference between the general topic and the focused research question below. Click on each topic or research question to read a relevant background article.
  2. Open ended questions. Start your question with Why or How. Notice the difference between the general question and the focused research question below. Click on each research question to read a relevant background article.
  3. Questions that focus on a solution to a problem. Notice the difference between the general question and the focused research question below. Click on each research question to read a relevant background article.

Key Takeaway

Remember, your research question is NOT your thesis statement. You will use your research question to focus on finding information that will help you craft your thesis statement as well as information that can provide evidence or support for that thesis.


Image Attribution

A question mark by Peggy Marco from Pixabay; pixabay license