About the Authors

Stephanie R. Anckle, Ph.D.

Whose History?: Expanding Place-Based Initiatives Through Open Collaboration

Stephanie Anckle earned her M.A. in Gender Studies and her Ph.D. in Education from Claremont Graduate University. Her research, teaching, and scholarship focus on transforming the lives of women and people of color through better educational experiences, improving social capital, and dismantling the negative perception of women and people of color that permeate the media. Dr. Anckle is currently on the job market and hopes to secure a position in California so that she can continue her work in place-based education and social justice within her local community.


Carrie Baldwin-SoRelle

Scholarly Bridges: SciComm Skill-Building with Student-Created Open Educational Resources

Carrie Baldwin-SoRelle is the social sciences and scholarly communications librarian at Lehigh University. While working on textbook affordability issues and expanding open access initiatives on campus, Carrie enthusiastically advocates for the capacity of OER to address equity gaps, facilitate collaborative pedagogy, and improve learning. She also supports the research needs of social sciences faculty and students, in and outside of the classroom. Carrie serves on the steering committee for the Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges (LVAIC) Information Literacy Learning Community.


Dorinne E. Banks

Adapting Open Educational Course Materials in Undergraduate General Psychology: A Faculty-Librarian-Student Partnership

Dorinne Banks is a librarian and member of the OER Team at George Washington University Libraries and Academic Innovation. She recently completed the Open Textbook Network’s Certificate in OER Librarianship Program and enjoys sharing what she learned with GWU administrators, faculty, and students.


Joshua F. Beatty

“And Still We Rise”: Open Pedagogy and Black History at a Rural Comprehensive State College

Joshua F. Beatty is an Associate Librarian at SUNY Plattsburgh. He has over ten years of experience in reference and instruction and has headed library efforts in digital scholarship, institutional repositories, and UX. As a an IR and digital scholarship manager at a student-focused public college he has advocated for the priority of student-created OERs both as a pedagogical imperative and as contributions to the scholarly record.


Christian Beck, Ph.D.

Humanities in the Open: The Challenges of Creating an Open Literature Anthology

Christian Beck is an Associate Lecturer of English Literature at the University of Central Florida, USA. He recently published a book on space and political resistance, Spatial Resistance: Literary and Digital Challenges to Neoliberalism (Lexington Books, 2019). While trained as a medieval scholar, Christian’s concern with and activism in social justice has moved his research into areas well beyond the Middle Ages to include, amongst other things, the use of historical literature in devising new forms of social resistance.


Anne M. Brown

Open Pedagogical Practices to Train Undergraduates in the Research Process: A Case Study in Course Design and Co-Teaching Strategies

A.M. Brown is an Assistant Professor and Science Informatics and Health Analytics Coordinator at Virginia Tech, serving in University Libraries. Her role is to collaborate with faculty and students on the integration of computational thinking and discipline-specific computational tools into their research labs and classrooms. She has expertise in bioinformatics and computational biology, as well as finding data-centric solutions for consultations across campus and with partners from various domains. She is involved in the training and mentorship of undergraduate research students in these areas, in addition to creating communities of practice that have students training, applying, and solving data problems of the campus. She pursues pedagogical research in best routes and frameworks for experiential learning and workforce development. She recently received the Virginia Tech Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Award for these endeavors and was named Outstanding Undergraduate Research Faculty Mentor.


Sheri A. Brown

A 2-for-1 Deal: Earn Your AA While Learning About Information Literacy Using OER

Sheri A. Brown is faculty reference librarian at the Downtown Campus at Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ). She has 25 years of experience as an academic librarian and her primary role is instruction and public services. She recently served as a Florida Advisory Board member for an Institute of Museum and Library Services Grant investigating community college librarian and student perceptions of student information literacy needs. She was the 2012 Outstanding Faculty Award recipient.


Rose-Marie Chierici, Ph.D.

“What If We Were To Go?”: Undergraduates Simulate the Building of an NGO From Theory To Practice

Rose-Marie Chierici is an emeritus professor of anthropology from the State University of NY at Geneseo, having worked there between 1994-2015. Rose-Marie’s passion is in applied and cultural anthropology and her teaching style mirrors her groundbreaking fieldwork in her home country, Haiti. Chierici is a co-founder of Haiti Outreach Pwoje Espwa (H.O.P.E.), a Rochester-based organization focused on promoting social justice and a better future for Haiti.


Mary Lee Cunill, Ph.D.

A 2-for-1 Deal: Earn Your AA While Learning About Information Literacy Using OER

Mary Lee Cunill is a Professor of Speech Communication at FSCJ and the Owner of Try Communication Consulting. She provides her students and clients a toolkit to achieve a growth mindset, value interpersonal diversity, and to create and maintain healthy relationships. She is passionate about helping people see and actualize their potential.


Kimberly Davies Hoffman

“What If We Were To Go?”: Undergraduates Simulate the Building of an NGO From Theory To Practice

Kimberly Davies Hoffman serves as the University of Rochester’s Head of Outreach, Learning, and Research Services at the River Campus Libraries. With interests in engaging pedagogy, instructional design, assessment, and creating professional development opportunities, she has been a founding member for programs like LILAC, the 3Ts, and RYSAG. Recent projects include her participation in SPARC’s Open Education Leadership Program, the ARL Digital Scholarship Institute, and a grant-based digital collection of case studies highlighting faculty’s teaching with technology (DigITaL, Digital Ideas in Teaching and Learning. Kimberly earned her MLS at the University at Buffalo and a BA in French and International Relations at the University of New Hampshire.


Anna Davis

Mathematics Courses and the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative: Collaborative Course Content Building for Statewide Use

Anna Davis, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Mathematics at Ohio Dominican University and serves on the steering committee for the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative (OOEC). As part of the effort funded by the state of Ohio, she served as a content writer, team lead and project manager for several open courses developed by OOEC. She is involved in promoting affordability initiatives on her campus and across the state of Ohio. Her interest in OER evolved from her extensive work on developing open multimedia materials and pedagogy for flipped upper-level mathematics courses.


Lisa Di Valentino

Sharing the End of the World: Students’ Perceptions of Their Self-Efficacy in the Creation of Open Access Digital Learning Objects

Lisa Di Valentino is the Law and Public Policy Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She first became aware of open access and open pedagogy at McMaster University in 1996 when she was asked to publish a course assignment on the Internet; the essay was subsequently used in the curriculum of an Australian university. Her endeavors in open pedagogy continued as the founding Editor-in-Chief of the Western Journal of Legal Studies, an open access law review at the University of Western Ontario which publishes student work. Since then she has advocated for free access to knowledge and encouraged authors (both faculty and student) to make their works widely available.


Daniel S. Dotson

Mathematics Courses and the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative: Collaborative Course Content Building for Statewide Use

Daniel S. Dotson is a science librarian at The Ohio State University. He has been an advocate of affordability of course materials for over ten years. With the growth of ebooks and streaming videos in libraries and increasing availability of OERs, he sees great opportunities to reduce or eliminate the cost of course materials to students. He has been involved in multiple affordability projects, including self-initiated, library, campus-wide, and as outlined in this chapter, statewide.


Lily J. Dubach

Humanities in the Open: The Challenges of Creating an Open Literature Anthology

Lily Dubach is the UCF Connect Librarian for the University of Central Florida at Valencia College West Campus. In this role, she supports the university-college partnership and advocates for student success. She won the 2020 Florida Library Association’s Outstanding New Librarian Award in part because of her efforts with textbook affordability, outreach, and instruction. Her interests center on student success, inclusion, and accessibility.


Joe Easterly

Reading British Modernist Texts: A Case in Open Pedagogy

Joe Easterly is Digital Humanities Librarian at the University of Rochester River Campus Libraries, where he assists faculty, students, and staff in the development of digital scholarship and interactive scholarly publications.


Susan J. Erickson

Adventures in a Connectivist MOOC on Open Learning

Susan Erickson is Director of Hofheimer Library at Virginia Wesleyan University. Sue provides leadership for resource sharing in the VIVA consortium of academic libraries in Virginia and serves on the Library Advisory Committee of the State Council on Higher Education for Virginia. With over 20 years of experience working in academic libraries, she offers consulting (http://sueerickson.com/) for accreditation and external review and facilitation for team building and strategic planning.


Tia Esposito

A 2-for-1 Deal: Earn Your AA While Learning About Information Literacy Using OER

Tia Esposito is a Library Services Coordinator at the University of North Florida. She was recognized by the American Library Association (ALA) Office for Information Technology Policy and the Library & Information Technology Association (LITA) with the Cutting-Edge Technology in Library Services Award for 2013 for the mobile initiative she designed using OER’s. Based upon the success of the OER mobile initiative, her library program was subsequently written about in Pew Internet & American Life Project as a model for innovative library services. She was invited to present on Mobile Digital Learning Tools at the American Library Association in Chicago 2013. She has presented internationally on using OERS and mobile technology to cultivate active learning of information literacy skills including presenting at the Librarian’s Information Literacy Association Conference (LILAC) in Glasgow, Scotland. She has published widely including chapters and articles on web scale discovery systems, open educational resources, and instructional outreach. She has experience in both the creation and cataloging of OER. Her area of expertise is electronic resources.


Amanda L. Folk

Mathematics Courses and the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative: Collaborative Course Content Building for Statewide Use

Amanda L. Folk is assistant professor and Head, Teaching & Learning at The Ohio State University Libraries. Amanda has served as the co-PI on a research study examining the adoption of open materials through the Affordable Learning Exchange (ALX) at Ohio State, as well as the co-PI on the evaluation of the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative initiative. Her department publishes its own open textbook, Choosing & Using Sources: A Guide to Academic Research (https://go.osu.edu/choosingsources).


Ashwini Ganeshan

Harnessing the Power of Student-Created Content: Faculty and Librarians Collaborating in the Open Educational Environment

Ashwini Ganeshan is an Assistant Professor of Hispanic Linguistics in the Department of Modern Languages at Ohio University. Beyond linguistics, she has a keen interest in pedagogy. In her classes, she aims to create the conditions that foment student agency, spur meaningful learning experiences, and favorably impact students’ self-efficacy and self-confidence. In this quest, she discovered open educational practices to be an effective and exciting tool. As a multilingual, she is resolutely committed to the teaching and learning of world languages and she integrates global social justice issues as a key component in all her classes with the goal of helping students develop language proficiency and intercultural competence and knowledge, and critical thinking skills.


Christopher S. Guder

Harnessing the Power of Student-Created Content: Faculty and Librarians Collaborating in the Open Educational Environment

Christopher Guder is the Subject Librarian for Education at Ohio University. He earned a Ph.D. in Instructional Technology from Ohio University, and an M.L.I.S. from Kent State University. His research interests include data visualization, open pedagogy, and adaptive/assistive technology.


Lindsey Gumb, M.L.I.S.

Library Support for Scaffolding OER-enabled Pedagogy in a General Education Science Course

Lindsey Gumb is an assistant professor and the scholarly communications librarian at Roger Williams University, where she has been leading OER adoption, revision, and creation since 2016, focusing heavily on OER-enabled pedagogy collaborations with faculty. She co-chairs the Rhode Island State Open Textbook Initiative Steering Committee and is the Fellow for Open Education at the New England Board of Higher Education. Her research focuses on the intersections of Open Education and Information Literacy.


Timothy C. Hartnett

“And Still We Rise”: Open Pedagogy and Black History at a Rural Comprehensive State College

Timothy Hartnett was a reference and instruction librarian at SUNY Plattsburgh for 35 years. He received his BA in history at SUNY Plattsburgh and his MLS at SUNY Albany in 1983.

Tim was also a singer, songwriter, and DJ, a SUNY Plattsburgh alumnus, and a lover of local and regional history and music. These roles and interests combined to lead Tim to compile a list of musicians, performers, activists, speakers, and writers who appeared at SUNY Plattsburgh from 1955-1998. This work then became the inspiration and the basis for the exhibit created by the students in Dr. John McMahon’s spring 2019 African American Political Thought course, a project that Tim said was a “librarian’s dream project.”


Shanna Hollich

Open Pedagogy Big and Small: Comparing Open Pedagogy Efforts in Large and Small Higher Education Settings

Shanna Hollich is the Collections Management Librarian at Wilson College. They received their M.L.I.S. from Rutgers University and have worked in libraries for over ten years. They have undergone extensive training in both domestic and international copyright law and currently work for Creative Commons as a facilitator for the Creative Commons Certificate Course. It is this legal perspective that informs much of their OER advocacy and outreach. Their research interests are varied and include issues surrounding accessibility, library technical services, and social justice.


Sarah Hutton, M.L.I.S., Ph.D. Candidate, Education

Sharing the End of the World: Students’ Perceptions of Their Self-Efficacy in the Creation of Open Access Digital Learning Objects

Sarah Hutton is the head of Student Success and Engagement at the University Libraries, University of Massachusetts Amherst (U.S.). In this position, she oversees a department that works to support undergraduate student participation in research, scholarship, civic engagement, and the creation of creative works, helping individuals find and express their voice in the educational process and society. Sarah collaborates with faculty in moving their courses to an open model; whether creating OER with tools like Pressbooks or opening up the curriculum in OpenMoodle/LMS alternatives to collaborate across institutions, she endeavors to open the conversation and content at every possible turn, with a focus on creating renewable assignments that support a student-centered peer learning model. Her research focuses on the impact of open pedagogical praxis and OER on student motivation, self-efficacy, and engagement in scholarship. Drawing on a foundation of open publishing, open science, and civic engagement, she has developed and taught programming in support of the UN SDGs for UAE MOE cohorts of student and faculty leaders, as well as connecting regional makerspace networks with global partners.


Shanna S. Jaggars

Mathematics Courses and the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative: Collaborative Course Content Building for Statewide Use

Shanna Smith Jaggars is the Assistant Vice-Provost of Research and Program Assessment for the Office of Student Academic Success at The Ohio State University, and Principal Investigator of a statewide study of the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative.


Stacy Katz

Evolving Into the Open: A Framework for Collaborative Design of Renewable Assignments

Stacy Katz is Assistant Professor and Open Resources Librarian-STEM Liaison at Lehman College, CUNY. She initiated, developed, and oversees the Open Educational Resources (OER) initiative for the college. Stacy’s research to date has focused on OER, particularly how librarians develop and support OER initiatives, faculty professional development in OER, and student views on OER. Stacy is a 2018-2019 OER Research Fellow and 2019 Institute for Research Design in Librarianship Scholar. Her research has appeared in Open Praxis, Journal of Perspectives in Applied Academic Practice, and the New Review of Academic Librarianship.


Brian W. Keith

Open Pedagogical Design for Graduate Student Internships, A New Collaborative Model

Brian W. Keith is Associate Dean for Administration and Faculty Affairs at the George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida. Brian is the senior administrator for the areas of Human Resources, Staff Development, Grants Management, Facilities and Security, and Finance and Accounting with comprehensive responsibilities in each of these support functions. As a senior administrator, he also contributes to wide ranging and impactful decisions and to the determination of the strategic directions of the Libraries as a whole. In these roles, Brian’s work enables the Libraries to meet challenges while fostering transparency, fairness and inclusion, workplace and workforce development, and collaboration and partnerships.


Debra Kimok

“And Still We Rise”: Open Pedagogy and Black History at a Rural Comprehensive State College

I have been an instruction and reference librarian at SUNY Plattsburgh Feinberg Library since 2000 and the Special Collections Librarian/College Archives manager there since 2003. My interest in OERs stems from a strong interest in reducing student costs. My online Critical Research Skills class is an OER course and I regularly work with other campus faculty to introduce students to archival resources, which inherently are OERs. My research interests include teaching with primary resources, accessibility in libraries and archives, and digital archives preservation. I received my BA in history at SUNY Plattsburgh in 1997, my MLIS at the University at Buffalo in 2020, and the SAA Digital Archives Specialist certificate in 2019.


Amanda Koziura

Teaching Wikipedia: A Model for Critical Engagement with Open Information

Amanda Koziura is the Digital Scholarship Librarian on Kelvin Smith Library’s Freedman Center for Digital Scholarship Team. In this role, she regularly collaborates with faculty and students to bring digital humanities into the classroom and enhance their research efforts. She is leading a team tasked with transforming the library’s instructional program and is excited at the opportunity to bring a renewed emphasis on accessibility and access at the point of need. She is a founding member of Librarians for Equitable Professional Development, an informal organization of academic librarians who are interested in studying and advocating for more equitable professional development in libraries.


Stephanie N. Lewis, Ph.D.

Open Pedagogical Practices to Train Undergraduates in the Research Process: A Case Study in Course Design and Co-Teaching Strategies

Stephanie Lewis is a Collegiate Assistant Professor in the Honors College at Virginia Tech. She holds a Ph.D. in Genetics, Bioinformatics, and Computational Biology, which she has translated to curriculum development for honors students in a variety of ways. She is one of the pioneers of the college’s research-focused course offerings, which encourages students from all disciplines to practice higher-order thinking processes in their understanding and exploration of global challenges. Her dedication to access is reflected in her constant advocacy for and teaching of open access communication in these classes and through conference presentations. Her research interests include best practices for teaching use of computational tools for drug discovery and development, and pedagogical practices for engaging undergraduates in problem-solving and decision-making practices.


Neringa Liutikaite

Adapting Open Educational Course Materials in Undergraduate General Psychology: A Faculty-Librarian-Student Partnership

Neringa Liutikaite is an undergraduate cell and molecular biology student at George Washington University, where she supported students as a resident advisor. She is excited to continue her studies at the graduate level. Since her second semester at GW, she worked with Dr. Schell to implement an OER textbook for his redesigned undergraduate Psychology course.


Bette London

Reading British Modernist Texts: A Case in Open Pedagogy

Bette London is a professor of English at the University of Rochester. She teaches courses in modern and contemporary literature, Victorian literature and culture, and the novel. She is the author of The Appropriated Voice: Narrative Authority in Conrad, Forster, and Woolf (U of Michigan P, 1990) and Writing Double: Women’s Literary Partnerships (Cornell UP, 1999). Her research and teaching have been centrally concerned with questions of authorship, broadly conceived, to include such issues as the cult of authorship surrounding modernist and feminist icons; the construction of voice as a contested site of cultural and aesthetic authority; modes of literary production and transmission; collaborative writing and other alternative writing practices.


Amanda B. MacDonald, M.S.L.S., M.A.

Open Pedagogical Practices to Train Undergraduates in the Research Process: A Case Study in Course Design and Co-Teaching Strategies

Amanda B. MacDonald is the Undergraduate Research Services Librarian at Virginia Tech. In her role, she serves as the liaison to the Office of Undergraduate Research, the Honors College, and the departments of Human Development and Biological Sciences. Her work and research focuses on creating openly accessible resources to support students and faculty engaging with formal undergraduate research experiences. She coordinates the Advanced Research Skills Program for University Libraries and is deeply involved in the university’s Undergraduate Research Excellence Program. Prior to VT, she served as the QEP Undergraduate Research Librarian at Louisiana State University and taught composition as an adjunct faculty member at Coastal Carolina University. She earned an MSLS from UNC Chapel Hill (2014) and an MA in English from Auburn University (2010).


Denise G. Malloy, J.D., Ed.D.

Invitation to Innovation: Transforming the Argument-Based Research Paper to Multimodal Project

Denise Malloy is an Assistant Professor in the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program at the University of Rochester. After nearly two decades of teaching experience, she is enthusiastic about the possibilities that OER brings to her writing classroom.


Amanda McAndrew, M.A. Ed.

Approaching Open Pedagogy in Community and Collaboration

Amanda McAndrew is currently the Faculty Services Portfolio Manager for ASSETT (Arts and Sciences Support of Education Through Technology) at the University of Colorado Boulder. In this role, she provides course design workshops and support, and develops several varieties of faculty learning communities. She has been a high school teacher, an instructor in an elementary education licensure program, and worked in instructional design, education technology, and faculty development for over 20 years. Amanda’s passions remain rooted in digital literacy and constructivist approaches to teaching and learning, but have evolved to include open pedagogy, critical digital pedagogy, and information literacy.


Bryan James McGeary

Harnessing the Power of Student-Created Content: Faculty and Librarians Collaborating in the Open Educational Environment

Bryan James McGeary is the Learning Design and Open Education Engagement Librarian at Pennsylvania State University. Additionally, he is an OER Specialist for Affordable Learning PA (Pennsylvania’s statewide OER initiative), a graduate of the inaugural cohort of the Open Textbook Network’s Certificate in OER Librarianship, and co-editor of the peer-reviewed open access journal Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice. Previously, he was an Information Literacy Librarian at Dickinson College and Subject Librarian for the Humanities at Ohio University. He earned a Ph.D. in American Culture Studies from Bowling Green State University, an M.L.I.S. from the University of Pittsburgh, and an M.S. in Journalism from Ohio University. His research interests include open pedagogy, the intersections of librarianship and popular culture, and the relationship between place branding and regional identity.


John McMahon

“And Still We Rise”: Open Pedagogy and Black History at a Rural Comprehensive State College

John McMahon is Assistant Professor of Political Science at SUNY Plattsburgh, where he teaches courses in political theory, feminist politics, and Black politics. His research interests include political theories of work and labor, Black political thought, feminist political thought, and political science pedagogy. His scholarship has been published in Political Theory, Contemporary Political Theory, New Political Science, and the Journal of Political Science Education, among other venues. He is also one of the hosts of the Always Already critical theory podcast.


Heather Miceli

Library Support for Scaffolding OER-enabled Pedagogy in a General Education Science Course

Dr. Heather Miceli is an adjunct professor at Roger Williams University where she teaches general education science courses. She has over 10 years of teaching experience and holds a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Rhode Island and Rhode Island College, where she focused on the pedagogical development of adjunct professors in science. She was a 2019-20 OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group. Heather is very interested in various pedagogies in general education courses as a means of reducing science anxiety and increasing student confidence, including open pedagogy, ungrading, and reflective writing.


Jacob Moore

Open Pedagogy Big and Small: Comparing Open Pedagogy Efforts in Large and Small Higher Education Settings

Jacob Moore is an Associate Professor of Engineering at Penn State Mont Alto. He has a Ph.D. in Engineering Education as well as a Master’s and Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering. His research interests center around engineering education, with interests in open educational resources, concept mapping, and student assessment. Additionally he is the lead author of the Mechanics Map Open Textbook Project, hosting OER content for introductory engineering statics and dynamics.


Paul Musgrave

Sharing the End of the World: Students’ Perceptions of Their Self-Efficacy in the Creation of Open Access Digital Learning Objects

Paul Musgrave is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and is also affiliated with the Commonwealth Honors College there. He comes to this project as the teacher of The Politics of the End of the World, a course designed to help students better understand their place in the world by creating a podcast about how previous generations have faced the ends of the their worlds.


Sarah A. Norris

Humanities in the Open: The Challenges of Creating an Open Literature Anthology

Sarah Norris is Scholarly Communication Librarian at the University of Central Florida Libraries. In this role, she leads the UCF Libraries’ Scholarly Communication and open access efforts, with an emphasis on scholarly publishing and copyright training and open education. Her research interests include digital humanities and copyright implications in the digital environment, as well as open access efforts including the expanded use of OERs in the classroom. She has participated in a variety of OER projects and efforts at the University of Central Florida and has presented on these experiences at a variety of conferences, such as OpenEd and HASTAC.


Cynthia Mari Orozco

Informed Open Pedagogy and Information Literacy Instruction in Student-Authored Open Projects

Cynthia is a community college librarian at East Los Angeles College, in which her primarily responsibilities are in reference, instruction, and outreach services. Currently, she is a de facto OER expert on campus although she hopes to continue working towards building a sustainable OER infrastructure at the college and district levels.


Kaity Prieto

Mathematics Courses and the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative: Collaborative Course Content Building for Statewide Use

Kaity Prieto, Ph.D. is the University Innovation Alliance Fellow for The Ohio State University. She conducts interdisciplinary, qualitative student success research. She has written and presented on open educational resources (OER), open pedagogy, and institutional and statewide textbook affordability initiatives. Her research agenda centers the experiences of LGBTQ+ students, with a focus on bisexual, pansexual, and fluid student communities. Her dissertation research explores bisexual college student identity negotiation.


Einav Rabinovitch-Fox

Teaching Wikipedia: A Model for Critical Engagement with Open Information

Einav Rabinovitch-Fox teaches modern U.S. and women’s and gender history at Case Western Reserve University. She holds a Ph.D. in History from New York University (2014) and her research examines the connections between fashion, politics, and modernity. Einav has published on fashion, femininity, and feminism in scholarly journals and books, as well as public venues such as Public Seminar, The Conversation, On the Media, and Dismantle Magazine. In her teaching, she uses a range of experiential methods and open access platforms to enhance students’ engagement, as well as designing assignments that utilize open access research and methods. Her latest project was creating together with students the online exhibition www.clevelandsuffrage.com.


Marcos D. Rivera

Mathematics Courses and the Ohio Open Ed Collaborative: Collaborative Course Content Building for Statewide Use

Dr. Marcos D. Rivera is a higher education and student success postdoctoral researcher in the Office of Student Academic Success at The Ohio State University. He conducts interdisciplinary mixed-methods research with an emphasis on college student academic success and retention. Marcos’s experiences and interests focus on understanding the impact of academic interventions and programs; sharing student stories to inform policy and practice; and leading teams to enhance the student experience by developing innovative approaches to answering complex questions.


Mantra Roy, Ph.D.

Reading British Modernist Texts: A Case in Open Pedagogy

Mantra Roy is the Open Education Librarian at the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library at San Jose State University in San Jose, California. She learned about OER through the world of Open Access and Copyright and Creative Commons licenses. She believes in social justice in education and identifies OER as one of many tools in creating access to education.


Dennis Schell

Adapting Open Educational Course Materials in Undergraduate General Psychology: A Faculty-Librarian-Student Partnership

Dennis E. Schell, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at The George Washington University. He is new to open educational resources (OER) and is currently the only faculty in the department to transition to a free online textbook, which he has been using for his General Psychology class for three years. His research with student use of the textbook shows overwhelming satisfaction.


Ashley Shea

Building a Collection of Openly Licensed Student-Developed Videos

Ashley L. Shea is the Head of Instruction Initiatives at Albert R. Mann Library, Cornell University. In addition to providing guest lectures for many diverse courses, she also teaches a newly developed one-credit course entitled “Information Chaos: Navigating Today’s Information Landscape.” Prior to becoming the Head of Instruction Initiatives, she served as the Food & Agriculture Librarian for Cornell’s College of Agriculture & Life Sciences.


Sarah Siddiqui

Invitation to Innovation: Transforming the Argument-Based Research Paper to Multimodal Project

Sarah Siddiqui is a Science and Engineering Outreach Librarian at the University of Rochester’s River Campus Libraries. She is interested in the trends and developments in scholarly communications, the research life cycle, and accessibility of resources. She received her master of science in Information Science from the University at Albany in 2018.


Caroline Sinkinson

Approaching Open Pedagogy in Community and Collaboration

Caroline Sinkinson is a teaching librarian and Head, Teaching and Learning Unit at the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries. She serves as one of the Libraries’ Open Educational Resources Leads and is deeply engaged in critical, digital, and open pedagogies. She is active locally on library and campus level working groups as well contributing to system level collaborations, such as the recently awarded OpenCU Initiative. Caroline is committed to pursuing diverse, collaborative, and open learning experiences that increase access and opportunity in and with vast information landscapes.


Amanda Spence

“What If We Were To Go?”: Undergraduates Simulate the Building of an NGO From Theory To Practice

Amanda Spence is a consultant at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene where she works with small independent health care practices to help them better utilize their EHR systems. She is a graduate of SUNY Geneseo’s B.A. program in International Relations, minored in Anthropology, and is currently an M.P.H. candidate at New York Medical College pursuing her masters in health policy and management. She is interested in the intersections between community health and wellness, technology, and social justice.


Jennifer M. Starkey

Teaching Wikipedia: A Model for Critical Engagement with Open Information

Jennifer M. Starkey is the Team Leader for Research Services at Case Western Reserve University’s Kelvin Smith Library. She works with the library administration to set priorities, carry out strategic initiatives, and communicate with the campus about library services and resources. Her team provides direct research support for students and faculty, as well as instructional services, collection development, and liaison services for fine arts, humanities, social sciences, natural and physical sciences, engineering, and management at CWRU. Jennifer’s subject background is in history and literature and in her previous role as a liaison librarian she frequently collaborated with faculty to develop meaningful research assignments that engaged students as scholars and citizens.


Jennifer M. Swann, Ph.D.

Scholarly Bridges: SciComm Skill-Building with Student-Created Open Educational Resources

Jennifer Swann is a professor of Biological Sciences at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA; she has been teaching undergraduates for over 4 decades. As an African American woman, she has championed minority concerns, including access to education, throughout her career. She became involved with the OER movement during her 4 years as the inaugural director of student success in the College of Arts and Sciences where she learned, first-hand, of the struggle first generation, low income students experience in trying to acquire educational materials. She has worked with librarians to alert faculty and administrators to the issues surrounding student and faculty use of OER and serves on the MERLOT Biology Board reviewing and promoting the creation and use of OER content.


Laurie N. Taylor

Open Pedagogical Design for Graduate Student Internships, A New Collaborative Model

Laurie N. Taylor is the Senior Director for Library Technology & Digital Strategies, where she provides leadership for technology and partnerships with the UF Libraries across the university, regionally, nationally, and internationally. She works closely with colleagues to create and sustain supports for compassionate and collaborative computing to build community and capacity, including through collaborations with the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and LibraryPress@UF. Her work is geared towards enabling a culture of radical collaboration that values and supports diversity, equity, and inclusion.


Jennifer Van Allen, Ed.D.

Evolving Into the Open: A Framework for Collaborative Design of Renewable Assignments

Jennifer Van Allen is an Assistant Professor of Literacy Studies at Lehman College, City University of New York. She has over 15 years of experience in education, ranging from elementary school to higher education. After noticing the degree to which teachers of all levels search for and share teaching materials, she realized the value of Open Educational Resources and open pedagogy as a vehicle for creating high quality materials that can be easily adapted for varying needs and contexts. She is an enthusiastic and determined advocate for open education at all educational levels.


John Venecek

Humanities in the Open: The Challenges of Creating an Open Literature Anthology

John Venecek is a Humanities Librarian at the University of Central Florida, where he serves as liaison to the departments of Art, English, Texts & Technology, and Writing & Rhetoric. His main areas of interest include open education resources, textbook affordability, and digital curation. Prior to becoming a librarian at UCF, John taught English for several years at the College of DuPage in Suburban Chicago and served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ekaterinburg, Russia, where he taught English and helped establish a foreign language library/resource center.


Sean D. Visintainer

Whose History?: Expanding Place-Based Initiatives Through Open Collaboration

Sean Visintainer has been working in special collections librarianship for ten years. As the Head of Special Collections & University Archives at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Sean developed a keen interest in integrating special collections resources into curricula as OER. As special collections resources are often unique, rare, or scarce, they are excellent candidates for OER, either as digital surrogates and/or contextualized into larger interpretive efforts, such as exhibitions, lesson plans, and educational supplements. Sean is currently the Head of Special Collections at California State University San Marcos.


Kristen Weischedel

Whose History?: Expanding Place-Based Initiatives Through Open Collaboration

Kristen Weischedel earned her M.L.I.S. with a concentration in Archives Management and M.A. in History from Simmons University (formerly Simmons College) in Boston, Massachusetts. She has held a number of library and archives positions, including working as the Digital Archivist for UTRGV in Edinburg, Texas. She currently works as the Digital Resources Management Librarian at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, Illinois. She is interested in digital resources, their access, and archival/special collections.

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Open Pedagogy Approaches by Alexis Clifton and Kimberly Davies Hoffman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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