Appendix B: MCCCD Competency and WPA Outcome Alignment

This page details the Maricopa Community College District English 102 competencies and the WPA learning outcomes aligned with the instructional content and processes, assignments, and assessments embedded in each chapter. (ENG-102-Competency-and-WPA-Learning-Outcome-Alignment.docx Word version or ENG-102-Competency-and-WPA-Learning-Outcome-Alignment.pdf)

MCCCD Competency and WPA Outcome Alignment
Chapter MCCCD English 102 Competency Alignment Writing Program Administrator (WPA) Outcomes Alignment
Chapter 1 College Writing, Rhetoric, and You

Brief Description

 

  • Write for specific rhetorical contexts, including circumstance, purpose, topic, audience and writer, as well as the writing`s ethical, political, and cultural implications.  (MCCD #1)
  • Organize writing to support a central idea through unity, coherence and logical development appropriate to a specific writing context. (MCCC#2).
  • Use appropriate conventions in writing, including consistent voice, tone, diction, grammar, and mechanics. (MCCCD#3)
  • Use feedback obtained through peer review, instructor comments, and/or other sources to revise writing. (MCCCD #7)
  • Assess one`s own writing strengths and identify strategies for improvement through instructor conference, portfolio review, written evaluation, and/or other methods. (MCCD #8)
  • Generate, format, and edit writing using appropriate technologies. (MCCCD #9)
Note: Content in this column is directly copied in from  the WPA Outcomes web page.

Rhetorical Knowledge

Rhetorical knowledge is the ability to analyze contexts and audiences and then to act on that analysis in comprehending and creating texts. Rhetorical knowledge is the basis of composing. Writers develop rhetorical knowledge by negotiating purpose, audience, context, and conventions as they compose a variety of texts for different situations.

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Learn and use key rhetorical concepts through analyzing and composing a variety of texts
  • Gain experience reading and composing in several genres to understand how genre conventions shape and are shaped by readers’ and writers’ practices and purposes
  • Develop facility in responding to a variety of situations and contexts calling for purposeful shifts in voice, tone, level of formality, design, medium, and/or structure
  • Understand and use a variety of technologies to address a range of audiences
  • Match the capacities of different environments (e.g., print and electronic) to varying rhetorical situations

Faculty in all programs and departments can build on this preparation by helping students learn

  • The expectations of readers in their fields
  • The main features of genres in their fields
  • The main purposes of composing in their fields
Chapter 2 Becoming a Rhetorical Insider

Brief Description

  • Write for specific rhetorical contexts, including circumstance, purpose, topic, audience and writer, as well as the writing`s ethical, political, and cultural implications.  (MCCD #1)
  • Organize writing to support a central idea through unity, coherence and logical development appropriate to a specific writing context. (MCCC#2).
  • Use appropriate conventions in writing, including consistent voice, tone, diction, grammar, and mechanics. (MCCCD#3)
  • Use feedback obtained through peer review, instructor comments, and/or other sources to revise writing. (MCCCD #7)
  • Assess one`s own writing strengths and identify strategies for improvement through instructor conference, portfolio review, written evaluation, and/or other methods. (MCCD #8)
  • Generate, format, and edit writing using appropriate technologies. (MCCCD #9)
Rhetorical Knowledge

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Learn and use key rhetorical concepts through analyzing and composing a variety of texts
  • Gain experience reading and composing in several genres to understand how genre conventions shape and are shaped by readers’ and writers’ practices and purposes
  • Understand and use a variety of technologies to address a range of audiences
  • Match the capacities of different environments (e.g., print and electronic) to varying rhetorical situations

Faculty in all programs and departments can build on this preparation by helping students learn

  • The expectations of readers in their fields
  • The main features of genres in their fields
  • The main purposes of composing in their fields

Critical Thinking, Reading, and Composing

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Use composing and reading for inquiry, learning, critical thinking, and communicating in various rhetorical contexts
  • Read a diverse range of texts, attending especially to relationships between assertion and evidence, to patterns of organization, to the interplay between verbal and nonverbal elements, and to how these features function for different audiences and situations
  • Locate and evaluate (for credibility, sufficiency, accuracy, timeliness, bias and so on) primary and secondary research materials, including journal articles and essays, books, scholarly and professionally established and maintained databases or archives, and informal electronic networks and internet sources
  • Use strategies—such as interpretation, synthesis, response, critique, and design/redesign—to compose texts that integrate the writer’s ideas with those from appropriate sources

Composing Processes

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Develop a writing project through multiple drafts
  • Develop flexible strategies for reading, drafting, reviewing, collaborating, revising, rewriting, rereading, and editing
  • Use composing processes and tools as a means to discover and reconsider ideas
  • Experience the collaborative and social aspects of writing processes
    Learn to give and to act on productive feedback to works in progress
  • Adapt composing processes for a variety of technologies and modalities
  • Reflect on the development of composing practices and how those practices influence their work

Knowledge of Conventions

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Develop knowledge of linguistic structures, including grammar, punctuation, and spelling, through practice in composing and revising
  • Understand why genre conventions for structure, paragraphing, tone, and mechanics vary
  • Gain experience negotiating variations in genre conventions
  • earn common formats and/or design features for different kinds of texts
  • Explore the concepts of intellectual property (such as fair use and copyright) that motivate documentation conventions
  • Practice applying citation conventions systematically in their own work
Chapter 3 Researching Rhetorically

Brief Description

  • Find, evaluate, select, and synthesize both online and print sources that examine a topic from multiple perspectives. (MCCCD #4)
  • Integrate sources through summarizing, paraphrasing, and quotation from sources to develop and support one`s own ideas. (MCCCD #5)
  • Identify, select and use an appropriate documentation style to maintain academic integrity. (MCCCD#6)
  • Use feedback obtained through peer review, instructor comments, and/or other sources to revise writing. (MCCCD #7)
  • Generate, format, and edit writing using appropriate technologies. (MCCCD #9)
Rhetorical Knowledge

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Learn and use key rhetorical concepts through analyzing and composing a variety of texts
  • Gain experience reading and composing in several genres to understand how genre conventions shape and are shaped by readers’ and writers’ practices and purposes
  • Understand and use a variety of technologies to address a range of audiences
  • Match the capacities of different environments (e.g., print and electronic) to varying rhetorical situations

Faculty in all programs and departments can build on this preparation by helping students learn

  • The expectations of readers in their fields
  • The main features of genres in their fields
  • The main purposes of composing in their fields

Critical Thinking, Reading, and Composing

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Use composing and reading for inquiry, learning, critical thinking, and communicating in various rhetorical contexts
  • Read a diverse range of texts, attending especially to relationships between assertion and evidence, to patterns of organization, to the interplay between verbal and nonverbal elements, and to how these features function for different audiences and situations
  • Locate and evaluate (for credibility, sufficiency, accuracy, timeliness, bias and so on) primary and secondary research materials, including journal articles and essays, books, scholarly and professionally established and maintained databases or archives, and informal electronic networks and internet sources
  • Use strategies—such as interpretation, synthesis, response, critique, and design/redesign—to compose texts that integrate the writer’s ideas with those from appropriate sources

Faculty in all programs and departments can build on this preparation by helping students learn

  • The kinds of critical thinking important in their disciplines
  • The kinds of questions, problems, and evidence that define their disciplines
  • Strategies for reading a range of texts in their fields
    Processes

Knowledge of Conventions

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Gain experience negotiating variations in genre conventions
  • Learn common formats and/or design features for different kinds of texts
  • Explore the concepts of intellectual property (such as fair use and copyright) that motivate documentation conventions
    Practice applying citation conventions systematically in their own work

Faculty in all programs and departments can build on this preparation by helping students learn

  • The reasons behind conventions of usage, specialized vocabulary, format, and citation systems in their fields or disciplines
  • Factors that influence the ways work is designed, documented, and disseminated in their fields
  • Ways to make informed decisions about intellectual property issues connected to common genres and modalities in their fields.
Chapter 4 Understanding and Composing Arguments

Brief Description

  1. Write for specific rhetorical contexts, including circumstance, purpose, topic, audience and writer, as well as the writing`s ethical, political, and cultural implications.
  2. Organize writing to support a central idea through unity, coherence and logical development appropriate to a specific writing context.
  3. Use appropriate conventions in writing, including consistent voice, tone, diction, grammar, and mechanics.
  4. Find, evaluate, select, and synthesize both online and print sources that examine a topic from multiple perspectives.
  5. Integrate sources through summarizing, paraphrasing, and quotation from sources to develop and support one`s own ideas.
  6. Identify, select and use an appropriate documentation style to maintain academic integrity.
  7. Use feedback obtained through peer review, instructor comments, and/or other sources to revise writing.
  8. Assess one`s own writing strengths and identify strategies for improvement through instructor conference, portfolio review, written evaluation, and/or other methods.
  9.  Generate, format, and edit writing using appropriate technologies.
Rhetorical Knowledge

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Learn and use key rhetorical concepts through analyzing and composing a variety of texts
  • Gain experience reading and composing in several genres to understand how genre conventions shape and are shaped by readers’ and writers’ practices and purposes
  • Understand and use a variety of technologies to address a range of audiences
  • Match the capacities of different environments (e.g., print and electronic) to varying rhetorical situations

Critical Thinking, Reading, and Composing

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Use composing and reading for inquiry, learning, critical thinking, and communicating in various rhetorical contexts
  • Read a diverse range of texts, attending especially to relationships between assertion and evidence, to patterns of organization, to the interplay between verbal and nonverbal elements, and to how these features function for different audiences and situations
  • Locate and evaluate (for credibility, sufficiency, accuracy, timeliness, bias and so on) primary and secondary research materials, including journal articles and essays, books, scholarly and professionally established and maintained databases or archives, and informal electronic networks and internet sources
  • Use strategies—such as interpretation, synthesis, response, critique, and design/redesign—to compose texts that integrate the writer’s ideas with those from appropriate sources

Composing Processes

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Develop a writing project through multiple drafts
  • Develop flexible strategies for reading, drafting, reviewing, collaborating, revising, rewriting, rereading, and editing
  • Use composing processes and tools as a means to discover and reconsider ideas
  • Experience the collaborative and social aspects of writing processes
    Learn to give and to act on productive feedback to works in progress
  • Adapt composing processes for a variety of technologies and modalities
  • Reflect on the development of composing practices and how those practices influence their work

Faculty in all programs and departments can build on this preparation by helping students learn

  • To employ the methods and technologies commonly used for research and communication within their fields
  • To develop projects using the characteristic processes of their fields
  • To review work-in-progress for the purpose of developing ideas before surface-level editing
  • To participate effectively in collaborative processes typical of their field

Knowledge of Conventions

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Develop knowledge of linguistic structures, including grammar, punctuation, and spelling, through practice in composing and revising
  • Understand why genre conventions for structure, paragraphing, tone, and mechanics vary
  • Gain experience negotiating variations in genre conventions
  • earn common formats and/or design features for different kinds of texts
  • Explore the concepts of intellectual property (such as fair use and copyright) that motivate documentation conventions
  • Practice applying citation conventions systematically in their own work

Faculty in all programs and departments can build on this preparation by helping students learn

  • The reasons behind conventions of usage, specialized vocabulary, format, and citation systems in their fields or disciplines
  • Strategies for controlling conventions in their fields or disciplines
  • Factors that influence the ways work is designed, documented, and disseminated in their fields
  • Ways to make informed decisions about intellectual property issues connected to common genres and modalities in their fields.
Chapter 5 Sourcing, Citing, and Integrating Evidence

Brief Description

 

  • Organize writing to support a central idea through unity, coherence and logical development appropriate to a specific writing context. (MCCCD #2)
  • Use appropriate conventions in writing, including consistent voice, tone, diction, grammar, and mechanics. (MCCD #3)
  • Find, evaluate, select, and synthesize both online and print sources that examine a topic from multiple perspectives.  (MCCCD #4)
  • Integrate sources through summarizing, paraphrasing, and quotation from sources to develop and support one`s own ideas. (MCCCD #5)
  • Identify, select and use an appropriate documentation style to maintain academic integrity.  (MCCCD #6)
  • Use feedback obtained through peer review, instructor comments, and/or other sources to revise writing.  (MCCCD #7)
  •  Generate, format, and edit writing using appropriate technologies. (MCCCD #9)
Knowledge of Conventions

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Develop knowledge of linguistic structures, including grammar, punctuation, and spelling, through practice in composing and revising
  • Understand why genre conventions for structure, paragraphing, tone, and mechanics vary
  • Gain experience negotiating variations in genre conventions
  • earn common formats and/or design features for different kinds of texts
  • Explore the concepts of intellectual property (such as fair use and copyright) that motivate documentation conventions
  • Practice applying citation conventions systematically in their own work

Faculty in all programs and departments can build on this preparation by helping students learn

  • The reasons behind conventions of usage, specialized vocabulary, format, and citation systems in their fields or disciplines
  • Strategies for controlling conventions in their fields or disciplines
  • Factors that influence the ways work is designed, documented, and disseminated in their fields
  • Ways to make informed decisions about intellectual property issues connected to common genres and modalities in their fields.
Chapter 6 Claiming Your Identity and Agency as a 21st Century Rhetor

Brief Description

 

Student reflects on their learning through the processes and skills embedded in the ENG 102 MCCCD Competencies.

  1. Write for specific rhetorical contexts, including circumstance, purpose, topic, audience and writer, as well as the writing`s ethical, political, and cultural implications.
  2. Organize writing to support a central idea through unity, coherence and logical development appropriate to a specific writing context.
  3. Use appropriate conventions in writing, including consistent voice, tone, diction, grammar, and mechanics.
  4. Find, evaluate, select, and synthesize both online and print sources that examine a topic from multiple perspectives.
  5. Integrate sources through summarizing, paraphrasing, and quotation from sources to develop and support one`s own ideas.
  6. Identify, select and use an appropriate documentation style to maintain academic integrity.
  7. Use feedback obtained through peer review, instructor comments, and/or other sources to revise writing.
  8. Assess one`s own writing strengths and identify strategies for improvement through instructor conference, portfolio review, written evaluation, and/or other methods.
  9.  Generate, format, and edit writing using appropriate technologies.
Student reflects on their learning across the WPA Outcomes.

Rhetorical Knowledge

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Learn and use key rhetorical concepts through analyzing and composing a variety of texts
  • Gain experience reading and composing in several genres to understand how genre conventions shape and are shaped by readers’ and writers’ practices and purposes
  • Understand and use a variety of technologies to address a range of audiences
  • Match the capacities of different environments (e.g., print and electronic) to varying rhetorical situations

Critical Thinking, Reading, and Composing

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Use composing and reading for inquiry, learning, critical thinking, and communicating in various rhetorical contexts
  • Read a diverse range of texts, attending especially to relationships between assertion and evidence, to patterns of organization, to the interplay between verbal and nonverbal elements, and to how these features function for different audiences and situations
  • Locate and evaluate (for credibility, sufficiency, accuracy, timeliness, bias and so on) primary and secondary research materials, including journal articles and essays, books, scholarly and professionally established and maintained databases or archives, and informal electronic networks and internet sources
  • Use strategies—such as interpretation, synthesis, response, critique, and design/redesign—to compose texts that integrate the writer’s ideas with those from appropriate sources

Composing Processes

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Develop a writing project through multiple drafts
  • Develop flexible strategies for reading, drafting, reviewing, collaborating, revising, rewriting, rereading, and editing
  • Use composing processes and tools as a means to discover and reconsider ideas
  • Experience the collaborative and social aspects of writing processes
    Learn to give and to act on productive feedback to works in progress
  • Adapt composing processes for a variety of technologies and modalities
  • Reflect on the development of composing practices and how those practices influence their work

Knowledge of Conventions

By the end of first-year composition, students should

  • Develop knowledge of linguistic structures, including grammar, punctuation, and spelling, through practice in composing and revising
  • Understand why genre conventions for structure, paragraphing, tone, and mechanics vary
  • Gain experience negotiating variations in genre conventions
  • earn common formats and/or design features for different kinds of texts
  • Explore the concepts of intellectual property (such as fair use and copyright) that motivate documentation conventions
  • Practice applying citation conventions systematically in their own work

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Claim Your Voice in First Year Composition, Vol. 2 by Cynthia Kiefer and Serene Rock is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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