TABLE OF CONTENTS

A:      SENTENCE STRUCTURE

A1: Fragments

A2: Run-on Sentences/Comma Splices

A3: Mixed Constructions

A4: Excessive Coordination or Subordination

B:      SUBJECT-VERB AGREEMENT

B1: Basic Standards

B2: Compound Subjects

B3: Separation of Subject and Verb

B4: Indefinite Pronouns

B5: Collective Subjects

B6: Subject after Verb

B7: Agreement with Who, Which, and That

C:       VERB ISSUES

C1: Perfect Tense

C2: Progressive Tense

C3: Perfect Progressive Tense

C4: Modals

C5: Use -d or –ed Endings Appropriately

C6: Prefer Active Voice

C7: Keep Verb Tense Consistent

C8: Subjunctive Mood     

D:      CAPITALIZATION

D1: Capitalization Rules

D2: Don’t Randomly Capitalize Words

E:       PRONOUN ISSUES

E1: Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement Problems

E2: Indefinite Pronouns

E3: Collective Nouns

E4: Subject and Object Pronouns

E5: Who vs. Whom

E6: Unclear Pronoun Reference

E7: Pronoun Consistency

F:       MODIFIER ISSUES

F1: Adjectives and Adverbs

F2: Double Negatives

F3: -ed, -en, and -ing Endings with Participial Adjectives

F4: Misplaced Modifiers

F5: Dangling Modifiers

G:      END PUNCUTATION

G1: Periods

G2: Question Marks

G3: Exclamation Points

H:      COMMAS

H1: Comma with Compound Sentences

H2: Comma with Introductory Word or Words

H3: Commas with Items in a Series

H4: Comma with Non-Essential Elements Inside a Sentence

H5: Comma with Non-Essential Elements at the End of a Sentence

H6: Comma with Coordinate Adjectives

H7: Commas with Dialogue or Quote Integration

H8: Conventional Uses of Commas

H9: No Comma with Essential Elements

H10: No Comma between Major Grammatical Elements

H11: No Comma Between Compound Elements that are not Clauses

H12: No Comma Between Non-Coordinate Adjectives

H13: Use a Comma to Prevent Confusion     

I:        SEMICOLONS

I1: Semicolons with Independent Clauses

I2: Semicolons with Items in a Series with Internal Punctuation

I3: Semicolons with Conjunctive Adverbs and Transitional Expressions

I4: Don’t Use a Semicolon Where it Should be a Comma

J:       COLONS

J1: Use a colon to introduce a list, a quote, or examples after independent clauses.

J2: Common misuses of a colon

K:      QUOTATION MARKS AND CITATION

K1: Direct Quotes

K2: Capitalization and Punctuation

K3: Quote Inside Quotes

K4: Titles of Short Works

K5: Integrating Quotations

K6: Block Quotations

K7: Brackets

K8: Ellipsis Marks

K9: APA In-Text Citation

K10: APA References List

K11: MLA In-Text Citation

K12: MLA Works Cited

K13: Hanging Indentation

L:       APOSTROPHES

L1: Apostrophe for Possession

L2: Apostrophe for Contractions

L3: Misuses of Apostrophe

M:     PARENTHESES
N:      HYPHENS
O:      DASHES
P:      WORD ISSUES

P1: Word Usage

P2: Articles and Nouns

P3: Jargon, Slang, Idiomatic, Sexist Language

P4: -S Endings

P5: Avoid Absolutes

P6: Depersonalize Prose

P7: Use Prepositions Properly

Q:      PARALLELISM

Q1: Items in a Series

Q2: Paired Ideas

R:      ITALICS/UNDERLINING

R1: Titles of Long Works

R2: Vessels and Foreign Words

S:       NUMBERS